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New Brunch Option

Creators of Houston's best brunch hope for another success with seafood twist

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Caracol oysters January 2014
The key to putting wood-roasted oysters on a buffet is knowing that eager diners will snatch them up as quickly as possible Photo by © Debora Smail
Caracol dining room without people January 2014
On Sunday, this dining room will be full of people getting their fill of brunchy goodness.  Photo by © Julie Soefer
Caracol The Blushing cocktail
The Blushing cocktail is one of the new offerings from beverage director Sean Beck  Photo by © Kenn Stearns
Caracol Paloma de Corazon cocktail
Or maybe a paloma is more appropriate?  Photo by © Kenn Stearns
Caracol Pulpo Almendrado octopus
This pulpo almendrado combines octopus, green olives, almonds and capers.  Photo by © James Heard
Caracol oysters January 2014
Caracol dining room without people January 2014
Caracol The Blushing cocktail
Caracol Paloma de Corazon cocktail
Caracol Pulpo Almendrado octopus

Two months into its life, Caracol is ready to join sister restaurant Hugo's as a top-tier destination for Sunday brunches. Owners Tracy Vaught and chef Hugo Ortega have spent the last 10 years proving that a buffet can offer delicious, high quality food, and Houstonians have responded by packing the Hugo's dining room week in and week out.

To say that brunch-o-philes have been eagerly anticipating Caracol's offerings would be like saying Aggie alums are mildly intrigued by the possibility that the Texans might draft Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel. For the non-sports fans reading this, let's just say they're giddy with An...tic...i...(say it! say it!)...pa...tion

Starting Sunday (Feb. 9) from 11 a.m until 2:30 p.m., Caracol will offer its own, seafood-oriented twist on brunch. Happily, the restaurant's signature wood-roasted oysters will be on the menu, along with a variety of egg dishes such as chilaquiles with eggs, migas, huevos a la Mexicana, tostadas de chorizo con huevo and more. Want something a little more lunch-y? Caracol will also serve chicharrones stew, enchiladas (fish or shrimp), wood-roasted bycatch and other surprises.

At $35, the price is only slightly higher than Hugo's $29 and still a solid deal given the expected overall quality and variety. 

Saving room for dessert is simultaneously one of the most difficult and most rewarding aspects of eating at Hugo's; Caracol promises to be no different, with the restaurant's massive kitchen turning out fresh pastries just for the meal under the direction of Ortega's brother Reuben. 

Because brunch without cocktails is just a late breakfast, beverage director Sean Beck has developed some new potent potables to supplement the restaurant's already extensive offerings. Those who prefer to keep things alcohol free can choose from aqua frescas, Mexican coffee and Hugo's signature Mexican hot chocolate.  

Caracol's already become a see-and-be-seen hotspot. This new brunch promises to elevate its status even further. Needless to say, reservations are recommended. 

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