Bar Feud Sabotage

Country western bar tries to sabotage rival with fake gay bar website: A Buck Wild court case

Country western bar tries to sabotage rival with fake gay bar website

Buck Wild country western dance club with crowd in Webster
Formerly called Bikini Beach, Buck Wild claims the fake website has and will cost it upwards of $5 million. Photo by Darrel G/Foursquare
Big Texas Dance Hall & Saloon sign Clear Lake or Webster
Big Texas Dance Hall stand accused of falsely representing a rival country-western by with a phony website. Big Texas/Facebook
Buck Wild country western dance club with crowd in Webster
Big Texas Dance Hall & Saloon sign Clear Lake or Webster

Instead of resorting to a mechanical bull competition or a line-dancing contest, a Webster county western bar designed a phony website to take on a rival club . . . a decision that has left the popular area establishment facing a multimillion-dollar lawsuit.

In April, Buck Wild country dance club threw open its doors for the first time only to discover an sexually-explicit website falsely portraying the new venue as a gay and lesbian bar. The owners eventually traced the sabotage to the nearby Big Texas Dance Hall.

Despite efforts to have it removed from the Internet, the explicit  phony page stayed active for months.

According to Harris County civil court records, the site featured a pair of naked men having sex along with the tagline, "Buck Wild Clear Lake is the #1 gay and lesbian country nightclub in the Houston area! Cum and get Butt Wild at Buck Wild."

The suit claims that Big Texas owners knew very well that its competitor was not a gay club.

Despite efforts to have it removed from the Internet, the phony page stayed active for months to causing "significant damages" to the newly-launched club, which formerly operated under the name Bikini Beach for close to seven years. The false Internet site was finally shut down in August.

Buck Wild owner Mani Mobasser — a club promoter for nearly three decades, according to the Houston Chronicle — now seeks a staggering $5 million for defamation and a full jury trial. Mobasser was unable to discuss the case with CultureMap on Friday, saying only that he's left the matter to the courts.

An on-duty manager at the Big Texas Dance Hall was unaware of the lawsuit, and club owner John Savage was not available for comment at the time of CultureMap's phone call.