Day 30

Michael Moore no-shows Occupy Houston: Director too busy signing books & napkins to join protest

Michael Moore no-shows Occupy Houston: Director too busy signing books & napkins to join protest

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Initiated by occupier Andy Meyer, Friday's Divestment March drew over 100 participants and scores of police officers. Photo by Tyler Rudick
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Sadly, Michael Moore didn't turn up at Occupy Houston's camp or Divestment March during his brief visit to the city on a current book tour. It was like Charlie Brown waiting for the Great Pumpkin. Courtesy of YouTube
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Occupier Joe Roche requested to have his photo taken with HPD's mounted officers in the background. Photo by Tyler Rudick
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Starting at Tranquiily Park, protesters marched on four major banks throughout downtown Houston. Photo by Tyler Rudick
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Friday morning's march brought a wide range of protesters representing a variety of ages and backgrounds. Photo by Tyler Rudick
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It was like waiting for the Great Pumpkin at Tranquility Park on Friday, as Occupy Houston anticipated the "imminent arrival" of acclaimed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, who is currently crisscrossing the country to promote his book, Here Comes Trouble.

The anti-greed group announced on its Facebook page that Moore was expected to show for Friday's 9 a.m. Divestiture March, during which protesters closed accounts at banks involved in the current economic crisis. While the march drew more than 100 participants, the controversial director was nowhere to be found.

Considering his late evening visit to Occupy Denver the night before, Occupy Houston protesters then guessed a sleepy, traveling Moore would appear closer to his scheduled 7:30 p.m. talk and book signing at Brazos Bookstore.

 "They ran out of books, so I signed napkins & arms," Michael Moore tweeted of his Brazos Bookstore signing. 

But by 9 p.m., the most newsworthy event was a police intervention at Occupy Houston's general assembly meeting, during which occupiers reported a scuffle between a protester and a homeless gentleman.

By 10 p.m., the occupy group retweeted a message reporting that Moore would not be able to visit. The filmmaker later commented on a busy evening at Brazos: "They ran out of books, so I signed napkins & arms."

Nevertheless, the Divestiture March proved to be one of Occupy Houston's most well-attended events since the campaign launched more than four weeks ago. The march garnered considerable attention, dragging several television news crews and scores of police officers through downtown Houston. With signs and megaphones, occupiers walked to four high-rise buildings holding Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Amegy bank branches.

Protesters closed active accounts at the national banks and shifted money to what the group calls "people-driven" local banks and credit unions. A credit card cutting ceremony followed the march.