Austin | Dallas | Houston
An Air Conditioned Legacy

New English manor inspired townhouses replace historic demolished Houston mansion

Enlarge
Slideshow
Courtlandt Manor at 411 Lovett Blvd. rendering July 2014 CROPPED
Rendering of the planned Courtlandt Manor, a development of 14 four-story townhomes to be located at 411 Lovett Blvd. Courtesy rendering
Lovett Manor before demolition 411 Lovett Blvd. a bit blurry
A look at the former 1906 Bullock mansion, which is believed to be the first house in Houston with air conditioning. DreamCraft.us
Courtlandt Manor at 411 Lovett Blvd. rendering July 2014 CROPPED
Lovett Manor before demolition 411 Lovett Blvd. a bit blurry

Courtlandt Manor — a "Wroxton Abbey" inspired development of 14 four-story townhomes — is set to break ground this summer at 411 Lovett Blvd., once the site of Houston's first home with central air conditioning and a longtime favorite venue for wedding receptions and social events.

Starting at $875,000, Courtlandt Manor townhomes will range from 2,906 square feet to 3,717 square feet. Design qualities include 11-foot-tall living room ceilings, hardwood or stone floors, decorative tile and custom cabinetry and lighting.

"Inspired by the breathtaking Wroxton Abby," officials at Croix Custom Homes, the builder, boast in a statement, "Courtlandt Manor offers buyers three distinctive interior options and eight custom floor plans that brilliantly blend charmingly classic elements with sleek, sophisticated designs."

 The former mansion was later converted into a high-tech office building, with a total renovation completed in 2005. 

"Croix Custom Homes is known for offering a wealth of amenities, and Courtlandt Manor is no exception," Mike Croix, president of Croix Custom Homes, said in a statement. "Game rooms, expansive garages, cocktail pools optional and rooftop terraces complete with a fireplace are only a few of the delights at Courtlandt Manor."

The sales center opening is scheduled for July 17; completion of the project is expected in February 2015.

The Bullock-City Federation Mansion, which met the wrecking ball earlier this year, was built in 1906 on that same site by oil entrepreneur Frank Bullock. The 5,000-square-foot structure sat on the 30,000-square-foot lot, with a gazebo for outdoor affairs. In 1926, Bullock had air conditioning installed. The decorative ceiling medallions from which the chandeliers hung were actually iron grates to hide the AC units.

New English manor inspired townhouses replace historic demolished Houston mansion

The City Federation of Women's Clubs purchased the house in 1948 for $60,000 to use for monthly club meetings and social events. The former mansion was later converted into a high-tech office building, with a total renovation completed in 2005.

Newsletters for exploring your city

Daily Digest

Houston news, views + events

The Dining Report

News you can eat

Insider Offers

Curated experiences at exclusive prices

Promo Alerts

Special offers + exclusive deals

We will not share or sell your email address