Foodie News

Failing Houston restaurant closes to revamp and reopen with a New Orleans celeb chef — and a new name

Failing Houston restaurant closes to revamp with New Orlean celeb chef

nosh bistro
Changes are coming to Nosh Bistro, which will relaunch as a wine bar on September 17. Photo by Sarah Rufca
Nosh Bistro interior bar September 2013
The purple accents are staying, but the restaurant is making other design changes. Photo by Eric Sandler
Nosh Bistro closing? September 2013 sign
This sign is currently posted at the front door.  Photo by Eric Sandler
nosh bistro
Nosh Bistro interior bar September 2013
Nosh Bistro closing? September 2013 sign

After less than a year in business, Nosh Bistro has temporarily closed while owner Neera Patidar makes some changes to the decor and retools the concept. When it reopens on Tuesday, the restaurant will be known as Parivartan at Nosh (the new word means "change") with the unofficial slogan "Who wrote the book (that a wine bar has to be a certain way)?"

For Patidar, the changes are designed to realize her original concept of Nosh as a lounge/supper club more fully. To accomplish that goal, she's brought in beverage specialist/consultant Eoghan Dillman and New Orleans chef Chris DeBarr, recently of the highly-touted Serendipity.

 Nosh served good food but had trouble attracting attention in the shadow of more famous neighbors like Haven and Twin Peaks. 

"We want to take a failing restaurant and revive it with the least impact possible," Dillman tells CultureMap. He describes Parivartan as a "bridge concept" designed to allow the restaurant to reintroduce itself to diners while still generating revenue and keeping its kitchen staff employed. Once the restaurant receives a full liquor license instead of its current beer and wine permit, it will change again into a permanent concept.  

For now,  Dillman wants patrons to consider Parivartan as a "playful, fun" lounge and supper club for professionals where they can come after work to network, close deals and relax. The wine bar will feature an extensive by the glass selection with prices ranging from $5 to $25. Bargain hunters will appreciate the restaurant's bottle prices, which will be set at near wholesale prices to clear out old inventory that accumulated from Nosh's four (?!?) different sommeliers.

Dillman calls it "the ideal incarnation of a wine bar when it only wants to break even."

As for the menu, DeBarr will be introducing Houston to his "psychedelic soul food" based on layering flavors and local ingredients. Anyone who stumbled into DeBarr's Lost Art of Spreading a Rumor pop-up back in June understands that the new menu should be a draw once word gets out. 

Whether it works remains to be seen. Nosh served good food but had trouble attracting attention in the shadow of more famous neighbors like Haven and Twin Peaks. Still, DeBarr's track record of success in New Orleans and Patidar's willingness to change are both good signs.