Barkitecture Rules

The coolest dog houses in the world: Big-name architects get bow-wow crazy


Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Rottet Studio
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Newberry Campa
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Leslie Elkins Architecture
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Abel Design Group
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, RdLR Architects
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Kirksey
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Clerkly Watkins
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, BLiP Workshop
Photo courtesy of Houston Pavilions
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, Philo Wilke
Photo by Jack Opatrny
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, PBK 1
Photo courtesy of Houston Pavilions
Barkitecture, dog houses, October 2012, John Gay
Photo by Jack Opatrny

The fourth annual "barkitecture" tour kicks off at the Houston Pavilions Friday night, setting up two days of canine residential architecture fun.

Benefiting Pup Squad — an area nonprofit dedicated to placing orphaned dogs in permanent adoptive homes — Barkitecture Houston 2012 displays more than 20 doghouses created by some of the city's most acclaimed architects, designers and builders.

All pet homes are for sale with 100 percent of the proceeds going to Pup Squad.

Free and open to the public, the event opens with a "Yappy Hour" charity party Friday evening from 5 to 9. Tours and a special auction will run from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday. Dogs on leashes are welcome, of course.

CultureMap got a sneak peak of the houses earlier this week  and . . . you need to see these in person. Check out these highlights.

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TO THE RIGHT: Rottet Studio looked to recycled vinyl artwork from the Houston Fine Art Fair and a wall of tennis balls for a modernist take on the humble doggie abode.

Newberry Campa has offered up an eco-friendly house designed to collect rainwater in a clever galvanized drinking trough.

Leslie Elkins Architecture created a versatile wooden shelter that doubles as an outdoor table. Slotted sliding doors on either side provide additional doggie-protection from the sun.

Observing the domesticated dog's penchant for burrowing, Abel Design Group made a seashell-shaped structure that allows your small pet to circle its way to the top of the doghouse.

Inspired by Le Corbusier's architectural masterpiece Villa Savoye, RdLR Architects's "Le Dog Hausss" provides ample roof space, if your canine friend likes to sleep Snoopy-style. For the interior sleeper, RdLR offers a circular bedroom shaped to follow the contours of the canine at rest.

Kirksey Architects has submitted this year's lone tensile structure, an expanding tent-like doghouse that's easy to transport.

One of several deconstructivist takes on barkitecture, this entry from the Clerkley Watkins Group highlights "the dichotomy between the simplicity of the construction and the complexity of the idea [of the doghouse]," according to the tour brochure.

BLiP Workshop had fabricated another deconstructed doghouse using a basic metal structure and sheets of stained plywood.

The PhiloWilke team set aside it usual health care designs for humans to create a eco-friendly doghouse that utilizes natural airflow to protect your pet from Houston's summer heat.

PBK 1 designed a house specifically form the tennis ball-obsessed dog, complete with a green and white color scheme and a bouncy-ball laser-cut pattern on the far side (sorry, not pictured).

Woodwooker and designer John Gay reworked an old cedar fence to create a house honoring the domesticated dog's longstanding work as a rescue animal.