Angry Stripper returns

Ex-Chronicle reporter stripper Sarah Tressler braves River Oaks amidst dispute with publishers

Ex-Chronicle reporter stripper Sarah Tressler braves River Oaks amidst dispute with publishers

Sarah Tressler, book signing, River Oaks Bookstore, July 2012
Former Houston Chronicle reporter Sarah Tressler received a small, but energetic group of fans for her Saturday appearance at the River Oaks Bookstore. Photo by Tyler Rudick
Sarah Tressler, Diary of an Angry Stripper
After a month-long book tour of popular strip clubs, Tressler is focusing her attention on writing as well as her formal EEOC complaint against the Chronicle. Diary of an Angry Stripper
Sarah Tressler, book signing, River Oaks Bookstore, July 2012
Sarah Tressler, Diary of an Angry Stripper

Writer Sarah Tressler received a small but lively bunch of fans for her appearance at the River Oaks Bookstore on Saturday. But while the mostly-male group enjoyed mingling with the nation's most infamous exotic-dancer-slash-journalist, their copies of her newly-released book Diary of an Angry Stripper went unsigned.

"If you're coming to River Oaks bookstore," she tweeted prior to the event, "I did not approve this version of my book for print; therefore, I will not be signing them today." Another post followed, noting that "as a matter of consideration," she would still be in attendance.

"Basically, I didn't approve this for print," she told CultureMap at the store, going through a list of issues rang ing from misspellings to pictures she didn't want published for a mass audience.

At the "signing," Tressler made a point of speaking with her visitors but kept talk of the book to a minimum.

"Basically, I didn't approve this for print," she told CultureMap at the store, going through a list of issues ranging from misspellings to pictures she didn't want published for a mass audience.

A representative from Di Angelo Publications, which produced the book and orchestrates all its publicity, said in a Sunday email that the company performed all its contractual duties and found it "unfortunate that [Tressler] has made these false allegations." The note wished the writer the "best of luck in her future endeavors."

Approved by its author or not, Diary of an Angry Stripper received a healthy dose of national press this July, including a favorable review from the New York Post.

Back in town

After more than a month on the road to promote her book at popular strip clubs across the country, Tressler seemed more interested in discussing her forced departure from the Houston Chronicle in the wake of the Houston Press revealing her side work as a stripper.

"They fired me over a story that ran in the Hair Balls section of the Press," she said, rolling her eyes. "Come on."

Noted attorney Gloria Allred, who was introduced to Tressler through Di Angelo Publications, is currently representing the writer in a formal EEOC complaint against her termination from the Chronicle.

In the meantime, Tressler is writing for Houston Modern Luxury and plans to return to the University of Houston in the fall as a journalism instructor.