first rule of flight club...

Sporty British pub/restaurant darts into buzzy Houston mixed-use development

British pub/restaurant darts into buzzy Houston mixed-use development

Flight Club Houston Regent Square
Flight Club promises a vibrant, festive atmosphere. Photo courtesy of Flight Club
Flight Club Houston Regent Square
Expect plenty of darts and pub games. Photo courtesy of Flight Club
Flight Club Houston Regent Square
The expanive, retro-Brit bar. Photo courtesy of Flight Club
Flight Club Houston Regent Square
Flight Club Houston Regent Square
Flight Club Houston Regent Square

A revolutionary, British dart-focused restaurant/bar/event venue is flying into a buzzy Houston mixed-use development. The bustling Allen Parkway corridor project Regent Square will welcome Flight Club, the immersive pub making waves in the U.K. and here in the U.S.

This is the first Texas Flight Club outpost, set to open late 2021. (The venue boasts a popular presence in Chicago.)

Visitors should expect a decidedly retro Brit vibe, with plush booths, semi-private gaming areas, vibrant vintage signage and decor, and a ubiquitous red phone booth in an 8,500-square-foot space.

Press materials promise a “unique social gaming experience through specially designed technology and spacious set-up,” as well as an eclectic bar program led by award-winning Peter Vestinos, plus a menu curated by acclaimed Chicago Chef Rich Gresh.

Oh, and the darts and games. Pub games and darts are central here; the space can accommodate groups of six to 400. More than 160 million darts have been thrown by some 2 million people globally since the venue launched in October 2015, per the company.

“Houston is an incredibly diverse city with vibrant food and drink scene–we are so thrilled that our first Texas location will be in this market,” said Alan Cichon, U.S. president of ownership company, State of Play. “Houston has shown the world time and time again how resilient it is, and we cannot wait to be a part of the fabric that makes up the Houston culture.”

Adding a little note that he gets it, Cichon noted, “everything is bigger in Texas, including our concept.”