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Redbud Gallery presents Patrick Palmer: “My Imaginary Mentor: Alexej Jawlensky” opening reception

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Photo courtesy of Patrick Palmer

Redbud Gallery will present the works of Houston-based artist Patrick Palmer in the exhibition “My Imaginary Mentor: Alexej Jawlensky.”

In 1953, the then Pasadena Art Museum was bequeathed with the largest collection of art from the Blue Four Artists that existed outside of Germany. These four German based artists - Kandinsky, Klee, Jawlensky, and Feininger - were all key figures of the important German Expressionist movement in the first half of the 20th Century. The unlikely influence of this major collection on Palmer, a then Southern Californian teenager, was huge.

Seeing a vast array of German Expressionist art had a great impact on his early understanding of art, and he was fascinated in particular by Alexej Jawlensky. He had an entire wall of paintings of women’s heads that were seemingly similar, but wildly different. Typical expressionistic heads that were filling the canvasses, painted with primarily skin tones of reds and oranges. They had wild patterned hair that was often in shades of green.

In the series for this exhibition entitled "Judith," Palmer used the image of a woman as his common denominator. Rather than use a single specific woman, he used a variety of women to show a variety of emotions, expressions, and spectrum of feelings.

Following the opening reception, the exhibition will be on view through November 3.

Redbud Gallery will present the works of Houston-based artist Patrick Palmer in the exhibition “My Imaginary Mentor: Alexej Jawlensky.”

In 1953, the then Pasadena Art Museum was bequeathed with the largest collection of art from the Blue Four Artists that existed outside of Germany. These four German based artists - Kandinsky, Klee, Jawlensky, and Feininger - were all key figures of the important German Expressionist movement in the first half of the 20th Century. The unlikely influence of this major collection on Palmer, a then Southern Californian teenager, was huge.

Seeing a vast array of German Expressionist art had a great impact on his early understanding of art, and he was fascinated in particular by Alexej Jawlensky. He had an entire wall of paintings of women’s heads that were seemingly similar, but wildly different. Typical expressionistic heads that were filling the canvasses, painted with primarily skin tones of reds and oranges. They had wild patterned hair that was often in shades of green.

In the series for this exhibition entitled "Judith," Palmer used the image of a woman as his common denominator. Rather than use a single specific woman, he used a variety of women to show a variety of emotions, expressions, and spectrum of feelings.

Following the opening reception, the exhibition will be on view through November 3.

Redbud Gallery will present the works of Houston-based artist Patrick Palmer in the exhibition “My Imaginary Mentor: Alexej Jawlensky.”

In 1953, the then Pasadena Art Museum was bequeathed with the largest collection of art from the Blue Four Artists that existed outside of Germany. These four German based artists - Kandinsky, Klee, Jawlensky, and Feininger - were all key figures of the important German Expressionist movement in the first half of the 20th Century. The unlikely influence of this major collection on Palmer, a then Southern Californian teenager, was huge.

Seeing a vast array of German Expressionist art had a great impact on his early understanding of art, and he was fascinated in particular by Alexej Jawlensky. He had an entire wall of paintings of women’s heads that were seemingly similar, but wildly different. Typical expressionistic heads that were filling the canvasses, painted with primarily skin tones of reds and oranges. They had wild patterned hair that was often in shades of green.

In the series for this exhibition entitled "Judith," Palmer used the image of a woman as his common denominator. Rather than use a single specific woman, he used a variety of women to show a variety of emotions, expressions, and spectrum of feelings.

Following the opening reception, the exhibition will be on view through November 3.

WHEN

WHERE

Redbud Gallery
303 E. 11th St.
Houston, TX 77008
https://www.redbudgallery.com/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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