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Photo by Taka Nonaka-Hill

In 19th century France a Flâneur was a man who was a connoisseur of the streets. Famous Flâneurs included Charles Baudelaire and Walter Benjamin. Honoré de Balzac described flânerie as "the gastronomy of the eye". Modern street photography takes cue from these predecessors as no other art form can. Kamps and Nonaka-Hill's exhibition slow-moving-eyes reveal two modern day Flâneurs and brings them together through their peculiar and arresting photographs. In these images we see moments caught that emphatically resonate. Nonaka-Hill's photos are incendiary in their poetically quiet nature. Kamps' dynamic and chimerical images draw out palpable compassion. These works in confluence actualize the words of Baudelaire,  an "immense joy to set up house in the heart of the multitude." 

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through April 16.

In 19th century France a Flâneur was a man who was a connoisseur of the streets. Famous Flâneurs included Charles Baudelaire and Walter Benjamin. Honoré de Balzac described flânerie as "the gastronomy of the eye". Modern street photography takes cue from these predecessors as no other art form can. Kamps and Nonaka-Hill's exhibition slow-moving-eyes reveal two modern day Flâneurs and brings them together through their peculiar and arresting photographs. In these images we see moments caught that emphatically resonate. Nonaka-Hill's photos are incendiary in their poetically quiet nature. Kamps' dynamic and chimerical images draw out palpable compassion. These works in confluence actualize the words of Baudelaire, an "immense joy to set up house in the heart of the multitude."

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through April 16.

In 19th century France a Flâneur was a man who was a connoisseur of the streets. Famous Flâneurs included Charles Baudelaire and Walter Benjamin. Honoré de Balzac described flânerie as "the gastronomy of the eye". Modern street photography takes cue from these predecessors as no other art form can. Kamps and Nonaka-Hill's exhibition slow-moving-eyes reveal two modern day Flâneurs and brings them together through their peculiar and arresting photographs. In these images we see moments caught that emphatically resonate. Nonaka-Hill's photos are incendiary in their poetically quiet nature. Kamps' dynamic and chimerical images draw out palpable compassion. These works in confluence actualize the words of Baudelaire, an "immense joy to set up house in the heart of the multitude."

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display through April 16.

WHEN

WHERE

jonathan hopson
904 Marshall St.
Houston, TX
http://jonathanhopsongallery.com/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.