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Photo courtesy of Houston Archeological Society

The first meeting of the Houston Archeological Society in 2020 will feature long-time HAS member, Wilson W. "Dub" Crook, as he gives a presentation on "An Update on the Peopling of the Americas."

The story of who were the first settlers in North America has been one of great interest to many Americans since the late 1800s when some of the first archeological discoveries on the continent were made. With the discovery of the first Clovis sites in New Mexico and Colorado in the 1930s, a theory developed that the makers of these characteristic fluted projectile points represented the earliest people on the North American continent. Known as “Clovis First,” the theory grew in acceptance to the point that it almost became scientific law. Starting in the 1950s, a number of sites were found which began to challenge the Clovis First theory.

The first meeting of the Houston Archeological Society in 2020 will feature long-time HAS member, Wilson W. "Dub" Crook, as he gives a presentation on "An Update on the Peopling of the Americas."

The story of who were the first settlers in North America has been one of great interest to many Americans since the late 1800s when some of the first archeological discoveries on the continent were made. With the discovery of the first Clovis sites in New Mexico and Colorado in the 1930s, a theory developed that the makers of these characteristic fluted projectile points represented the earliest people on the North American continent. Known as “Clovis First,” the theory grew in acceptance to the point that it almost became scientific law. Starting in the 1950s, a number of sites were found which began to challenge the Clovis First theory.

The first meeting of the Houston Archeological Society in 2020 will feature long-time HAS member, Wilson W. "Dub" Crook, as he gives a presentation on "An Update on the Peopling of the Americas."

The story of who were the first settlers in North America has been one of great interest to many Americans since the late 1800s when some of the first archeological discoveries on the continent were made. With the discovery of the first Clovis sites in New Mexico and Colorado in the 1930s, a theory developed that the makers of these characteristic fluted projectile points represented the earliest people on the North American continent. Known as “Clovis First,” the theory grew in acceptance to the point that it almost became scientific law. Starting in the 1950s, a number of sites were found which began to challenge the Clovis First theory.

WHEN

WHERE

Trini Mendenhall Community Center
1414 Wirt Rd.
Houston, TX 77055
http://www.txhas.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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