Sip and Shoot

Exploring EaDo: Ditch the car and catch the Wave to a funky alternative to Washington Ave

Exploring EaDo: Ditch the car and catch the Wave to a funky alternative to Washington Ave

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Cork Soakers Photo via EaDo Life
News_EaDo_by Matt Pacetti
EaDo Photo by Matt Pacetti via EaDo Houston/Facebook
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The budda greats you at Huynh. Photo by Barbara Kuntz
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News_Warehouse Live_exterior_sign
News_EaDo_by Matt Pacetti
News_Carol Rust_Huynh_budda

Whether you're a longtime Houston resident, just visiting or new to H-Town, east Downtown, or EaDo is worth discovering — or rediscovering. Within close proximity of Discovery Green, Minute Maid and the George R. Brown Convention Center, the emerging area has much to entice both new business owners and culture-seekers looking for something a little funky.

Warehouses abound in the old Chinatown, and a bird’s eye view of downtown paints the backdrop, as does the construction of the hotly anticipated new Dynamo Stadium.

The key street, St. Emanuel, is a focal point from which several restaurants and bars stem; the eclectic neighborhood offers an alternative to the Washington Avenue and Midtown going out scenes. Much like the other two nightlife locales, parking can be a hassle, so we suggest you skip driving around aimlessly trying to find a parking spot (and skip the DUI) and instead catch a cab or The Wave, which includes EaDo as part of its route schedule.

 The key street, St. Emanuel, is a focal point from which several restaurants and bars stem; the eclectic neighborhood offers an alternative to the Washington Avenue and Midtown going out scenes. 

No need for a car once you're there. The places below are all within walking distance of one another, and although the area is still in transition, City Councilman James Rodriguez, who often meets up with friends and walks from place to place, says there's no reason for concern.

Rodriguez is crafting an ordinance that will help with aggressive panhandling and loitering.  Additionally, the South Central Patrol regularly monitors the area, and it's well-lit with lots of pedestrian traffic.

“I encourage people to come on down and experience EaDo first-hand," Rodriguez says. "We are open for business!”

So next time you're looking for something to do, add a little variety to your routine and check out some of what EaDo has to offer:

For the out-of-towners who have never been to Little Woodrow's (I assume most Houstonians and Austinites have) the scene is ultra laid back.  This location has plenty to offer in the way of  beer (35 on draft and 75 bottled) and TVs (one projection screen and 14 plasmas). This EaDo staple was the first Little Woodrow's in Houston to serve liquor; Rice Village is now on-board and the Midtown branch is slated to join the fun sometime in August.

With more than 50 television sets, plus the largest HDTV screen in Houston at over 21 feet, Lucky's Pub is a great spot to catch the big game. Take a break during halftime and strike up a game of washers, darts, pool or shuffleboard. The surprising menu includes gourmet-inspired pizza, burgers, wings and more than 250 beers.

Cork Soakers is from the same owners as Lucky’s Pub. The wine bar’s casual ambiance and decor make for a comfortable hang out spot. For something a little different on a Wednesday night, take the paint-your-own-masterpiece class for $35 as a local artist instructs. 

EaDo is also home to Warehouse Live, a concert venue that features both known and lesser-known music and comedic acts. Warehouse Live was converted from a warehouse built in the 1920s and can accommodate crowds from 150 to 1,500 people, depending on the show.

Do not drink on an empty stomach — also located within walking distance of the places mentioned above are these BYOB spots, where you can grab some grub before you saddle up to the bar:

Start your night out at Huynh Restaurant, where the staff is friendly and the atmosphere is lively. On the menu at the family run establishment are spring rolls, rice plates, noodle bowls and other fresh traditional Vietnamese dishes. For a dose of pep, forget Red Bull and 5-Hour Energy — the Vietnamese coffee with condensed milk will give you the kick start you need.  $2 per person corking fee.

For a Cajun meal, try Calliope’s Po-Boy. In business for more than 15 years, Calliope's makes their New Orleans’ Style Po-Boys with fresh baked French Bread and house-made dressings. No corking fee.