Foodie News

From farm to market, Houston's Revival gets love from National Geographic Traveler

From farm to market, Houston's Revival gets love from National Geographic Traveler

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The March/April 2012 edition of National Geographic Traveler National Geographic Traveler
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Market Fare Photo by Marene Gustin
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Strawberry preserves Photo by Ruthie Johnson Miller
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Oils and more at Revival Market Photo by Sarah Rufca
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News_hot restaurants_Revival Market_Strawberry Preserves
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A few decades after the industrial revolution, it was Andrew Carnegie who invented (or at least named) the economic concept of vertical integration, in which one company owns and runs each process in the production chain from the raw materials to the complete product. The concept was such a disaster that Carnegie never made any money or put his name on any enduring cultural institutions.

Just over a century later, the vertical integration is coming back into fashion in the food industry, albeit with a much sexier name.

National Geographic Traveler has a feature in the March/April 2012 issue on restaurants that are run by people who also produce the food served — the ne plus ultra of farm to table cuisine.

One of the restaurants featured in Houston's Revival Market. Revival co-owner Morgan Weber also owns Revival Meats in Yoakum, a small town located between Houston and Corpus Christi, and raises several heritage breeds of pigs and chickens that are butchered and served at the Market, mong other Houston restaurants.

“We wanted to do charcuterie as an Italian might, and smoke a brisket as a Texan,” co-owner Ryan Pera told Traveler.