It's a wrap

Cinema Arts Festival leaves lasting images


News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Shirley MacLaine_Joe Leydon
Photo by Amy Peterson
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Isabella Rossellini
Photo by Priscilla Dickson
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Isabella Rossellini_Richard Herskowtiz
Photo by Eric Hester
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_John Turturro
Photo by Priscilla Dickson
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Photo by Priscilla Dickson
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_MFAH reception
Photo by Priscilla Dickson
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Sam Green
Photo by Daniel Ortiz
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Utopia_The Quavers
Photo by Daniel Ortiz
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Sam Green_The Quavers
Photo by Daniel Ortiz
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Francios de Menil_John de Menil
Photo by Anthony Rathbun
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Francios de Menil_John de Menil
Photo by Anthony Rathbun
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Gravity
Photo by Daniel Ortiz
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Miguel Coyula_Margarita De la Vega-Hurtado
Photo by Ziporah Paskman
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Bill Plympton
Photo by Eric Hester
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Peter Elkind_Joe Holley_Alex Gibney
Photo by Daniel Ortiz
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Robert Ziebell
Photo by Eric Hester
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Gary Demars_Trish Rigdon_Terry Delaney
Photo by Anthony Rathbun
News_Cinema Fest Wrap_Bert Long
Photo by Priscilla Dickson

With Rosselini, Turturro, MacLaine and dozens of thought-provoking movies, the second annual Cinema Arts Festival Houston left a lot of lasting images. Here are some of them.

Shirley MacLaine and Joe Leydon share a laugh during a conversation at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston after a screening of Terms of Endearment. MacLaine received the genie-looking Texas Film Award statue that is sitting on the table.

An Andy Warhol painting of Lynn Wyatt looks over the shoulder of Isabella Rossellini at a party at Wyatt's home.

Isabella Rossellini and Cinema Arts Festival artistic director Richard Herskowitz engage in an intimate public conversation.

John Turturro was the main man during opening night.

A sizeable crowd turned out for the opening night showing of John Turturro's Passione.

After the showing of Passione, guests lingered at a reception at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

 

At Frentic Theater, filmmaker Sam Green narrates Utopia in Four Movements. In this “live documentary,” Green cues images and narrates in person, while sound designer-musician Dave Cerf and the Quavers perform the soundtrack.

The Quavers

Green, the film and the Quavers all together made for a unique experience.

Francios de Menil, left, and John de Menil, looking very much like John F. Kennedy Jr., speak about Max Ernst Hanging, a documentary about a 1973 exhibition at Rice University. The duo assembled the footage from the Menil Collection's archives. 

Francios de Menil and John de Menil await the showing of Max Ernst Hanging at the Rice Media Center, which Francois's parents and John's grandparents, John and Dominique de Menil founded.

Brent Green's Gravity was Everywhere Back Then was shown at Frentic Theater; sculptures and props designed by Green were on display at DiverseWorks.

Miguel Coyula and Margarita De la Vega-Hurtado discuss their movie, Memories of Overdevelopment.

Animator Bill Plympton was a strong presence at the festival.

Peter Elkind, from left, Joe Holley and Alex Gibney discuss Client 9, a documentary about former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer's fall from grace.

Robert Ziebell speaks about This State I'm In, a film that covers the nascent Houston arts scene in the late 1980s and early '90s.

Gary Demars, from left, Cinema Arts Festival executive director Trish Rigdon and Terry Delaney.

Bert Long at the closing night party.