the new Lois

Celebrity Makeover: Corpse Flower Edition

Celebrity Makeover: Corpse Flower Edition

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Zac Slayton wheels Lois into her new home. Photo by Steven Thomson
News_Lois_corpse flower_repotting_Soni Holladay
Hotriculturist Soni Holladay digs up Lois' tuber Photo by Steven Thomson
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Lois' tuber unmasked Photo by Steven Thomson
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Tuber Talk! Photo by Steven Thomson
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Lois, before being covered in more dirt. Photo by Steven Thomson
News_Lois_corpse flower_repotting_Zac Slayton
News_Lois_corpse flower_repotting_Soni Holladay
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Just when you thought the drama had died down, corpse flower Lois stole the spotlight once again this morning at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

Located on the top floor of the museum's parking garage is Lois' penthouse  — er, greenhouse —  where her tuber has continued to reabsorb material from her epic bloom as she's gone dormant. Now, the bloom has completely separated from her tuber (the bulb part of the plant), with the dead petals hanging as a corpse inside the greenhouse.

When horticulturalist Soni Holladay unearthed the tuber, it was placed on a scale, weighing in at 23 pounds. Indeed, Lois looked more svelte than ever this morning, having lost seven pounds since her last check-in. Once the numbers were tabulated, Lois was placed in a sleek black pot to continue its new tubular life cycle.

Celebrity horticulturalist Zac Stayton emceed today's event, which drew a sizable crowd of Lois fans as well as the expected slew of paparazzi. During her staycation at the greenhouse, Lois will remain in dormancy, enduring a cleanse that prohibits both water and food. The abstinence will keep the tuber healthy and increases the likelihood of Lois blooming again.

"It will be three to five months before a new leaf will appear," Stayton said, "and three to five years until a blossom reappears."

However, fans shouldn't hold their breath to hold their nostrils: "With Lois, everything is '-ish,'" explained Stayton, as the plant's taciturn timing is hard to pin down.