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Everything's ducky as Texas women honored in fight against childhood cancer

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The Aflac Duck wears a specially designed necklace by Kendra Scott
Kendra Scott designed a special necklace for the Aflac duck, right. Photo by Kim Christensen
Caitlyn Mortus wipes her tears after her speech at Aflac Duckprints Award at MD Anderson
Caitlyn Mortus, center, wipes her tears after being recognized at awards ceremony at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Photo by Kim Christensen
Catherine Blades, Kendra Scott,Caitlyn Mortus%2C Mia Gradney, Shannon Murray at Aflac Duckprints Awards at MD Anderso
Catherine Blades, from left, Kendra Scott, Caitlyn Mortus, Mia Gradney and Shannon Murray.  Photo by Kim Christensen
Caitlyn Mortus a patient designer posed with Leon Childrens Arts project coordinator%2C was honored at Aflac Duckprints Award at MD Anderson
Caitlyn Mortus and Leon Benavides, Children's Art Project coordinator. Photo by Kim Christensen
Kendra Scott in the middle and her Houston team with the Aflac Duck
Kendra Scott, fourth from the left, and her Houston team. Photo by Kim Christensen
The Aflac Duck wears a specially designed necklace by Kendra Scott
Caitlyn Mortus wipes her tears after her speech at Aflac Duckprints Award at MD Anderson
Catherine Blades, Kendra Scott,Caitlyn Mortus%2C Mia Gradney, Shannon Murray at Aflac Duckprints Awards at MD Anderso
Caitlyn Mortus a patient designer posed with Leon Childrens Arts project coordinator%2C was honored at Aflac Duckprints Award at MD Anderson
Kendra Scott in the middle and her Houston team with the Aflac Duck
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
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There was a lot to quack about at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as three notable Texas women were honored for their efforts in the fight against childhood cancer with the Duckprints Award from the Aflac insurance company.

One of the honorees, jewelry designer Kendra Scott, showed her support by designing a one-of-a-kind necklace for a stuffed toy duck — the company's famous symbol — to wear.

Also honored at the event to highlight  the Children's Art Project were Channel 11 reporter and anchor Mia Gradney, who regularly hosts benefits for the art program, and Caitlyn Mortus, a Katy woman who first got involved in the art project when she was treated for Burkitt's lymphoma at age 13 at the cancer center and became a featured designer, with seven art designs featured in the 2013 collection.

Scott, who is based in Austin, learned first-hand about cancer when her stepfather became ill in 1995 and was treated at Anderson. She has hosted numerous events to raise donations for the Children's Art Project.

The Duckprints campaign honors "people who have left their footprints in the fight against childhood cancer." Nominations of unsung heroes an be made on the Aflac website aflacduckprints.com. The company is donating $2 every time a user spreads the news about Duckprints on different social media channels including TwitterFacebook and YouTube, up to $2 million.

Aflac hopes to exceed $100 million in contributions by 2015 to help fund cancer treatment and research.

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