Houston's Reality TV

Houston's Sisters in Law rivals Real Housewives of Dallas for Texas reality TV love

Sisters in Law rivals Real Housewives of Dallas for reality TV love

Sisters in Law, Feb. 2016, screen shot
The Sisters in Law — Jolanda Jones, Rhonda Wills, Juanita Jackson, Monique Sparks — cast shares a toast in the first episode. Courtesy of We tv
Sisters in Law, Tiye, FEb. 2016
Civil attorney Tiye Foley. Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Vivian, Feb. 2016
Criminal lawyer Vivian King.  Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Jolanda, Feb. 2016
Criminal attorney Jolanda Jones. Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Juanita, FEb. 2016
Public defender Juanita Jackson.  Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Monique, FEb. 2016
Criminal attorney Monique Sparks.  Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Rhonda, Feb. 2016
Civil attorney Rhonda Wills.  Courtesy of WE tv
Sisters in Law, Feb. 2016, screen shot
Sisters in Law, Tiye, FEb. 2016
Sisters in Law, Vivian, Feb. 2016
Sisters in Law, Jolanda, Feb. 2016
Sisters in Law, Juanita, FEb. 2016
Sisters in Law, Monique, FEb. 2016
Sisters in Law, Rhonda, Feb. 2016

While that city to the north has been bragging about The Real Housewives of Dallas, which is set to launch in April, Houston is on the verge of being in the spotlight with its on version of reality TV, though this one has a professional edge.

Sisters in Law, featuring six successful African-American attorneys working in Houston premieres March 24 on the WE tv network. According to the network website, the eight-part series "follows a close-knit group of elite high-powered black female lawyers as they juggle their families, busy careers, and even more demanding social calendars."

While we didn't see any F-bombs in our preview of the first episode, there was enough reality-TV style whining and carrying on to earn it reality TV credits. But there was also the interesting angle of law cases to be won and the women's interaction and support of one another (with their fair share of bickering) in a world basically ruled by white males.

Former Houston city council member Jolanda Jones (seriously defending a murder suspect in the first episode) is joined by civil attorneys Tiye Foley and Rhonda Wills, public defender Juanita Jackson, and criminal attorneys Vivian King and Monique Sparks.

As required by reality TV, these women are good looking but without the over-the-top glam up of The Real Housewives series. They're more intelligent than the typical reality TV characters. And apparently counting on keeping their careers in tact, none appear ridiculous. 

Overall, Houston looks pretty good — at least in the first episode — with this group of women that stands a cut above the typical reality TV femmes.

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