Sneak Peek at Kitchen 713

Sneak peek: Acclaimed restaurant debuts new location with 'Global soul food'

Acclaimed restaurant debuts new location with 'Global soul food'

Kitchen 713 Wagyu strip with XO Bordelaise
Wagyu strip steak with XO Bordelaise sauce, crispy leeks, and mushrooms. Photo by Eric Sandler
Kitchen 713 James Haywood Ross Coleman
James Haywood and Ross Coleman, co-owners of Kitchen 713. Photo by Eric Sandler
Kitchen 713 whole fried fish
Whole fried fish is on the menu at Kitchen 713. Photo by Eddie Clarke, Two81 Photography
Kitchen 713 sign
The sign is up and ready to welcome diners. Photo by Eddie Clarke, Two81 Photography
Kitchen 713 Thai ceviche
Thai ceviche with fish skin chicharron. Photo by Eric Sandler
Kitchen 713 Fragmented glory cocktail
The Fragmented Glory blends tequila and mezcal with chili oil. Photo by Eric Sandler
Kitchen 713 cocktail
One of the new cocktails. Photo by Eddie Clarke, Two81 Photography
Kitchen 713 Wagyu strip with XO Bordelaise
Kitchen 713 James Haywood Ross Coleman
Kitchen 713 whole fried fish
Kitchen 713 sign
Kitchen 713 Thai ceviche
Kitchen 713 Fragmented glory cocktail
Kitchen 713 cocktail

The waiting may be the hardest part for fans of Kitchen 713, but it comes to an end next week. The process of relocating the acclaimed Southern restaurant from its original location in the Second Ward to Washington Avenue draws to a close on December 26 when the restaurant reopens to the public for the first time.

“At the last minute we saw this place,” co-executive chef-owner Ross Coleman says of the former TQLA/Commonwealth space. “We fell in love with it: nice, huge, big space. We love the area. We love Washington. We know Washington has a vibrant restaurant scene, so we just want to be in the mix.”

To achieve that goal, Coleman and partner James Haywood have developed an all-new menu. While a few staples like shrimp and grits and the Southern fried chicken for Sunday brunch remain, most of the menu items take their influence from five countries: China, Ethiopia, Italy, Mexico, and Thailand. They manifest themselves in dishes like ceviche with Thai chiles and fish skin chicarron, Ethiopian beef tartare with cardamon, and waygu strip steak with housemade XO Bordelaise sauce.

“It’s a much more expanded menu,” Haywood says. “We have some of the classic features, we kept some of those, but now it’s much more expanded. ‘Global soul,’ we call it now: unpretentious, unadulterated soul food, not Southern soul food.”

Coleman demurs on the question of whether there’s one particular dish he’s most excited about. “We really don’t have any throwaway dishes. Everything we have we really put our heart and soul into. I would love to eat through the whole menu if I were a guest,” he says.

In addition to having more room for diners, the new space will also allow Kitchen 713 to serve alcohol, and the new cocktails take their inspiration from the same countries as the food. The Fragmented Glory combines tequila and Sichuan peppercorn-infused mezcal with chili oil and lime juice. Meant to connote the smell of dishes being seared in a wok, the drink delivers smoke and spice along with the slight numbing tingle associated with peppercorns (Update: Kitchen 713 will be BYOB when it opens, pending receipt of its liquor license in early January). 

Changes to the space include new paint to replace the gold, knocking down a wall to unite the bar with the dining room, and all new furniture. The look isn’t showy, but the overall level of polish demonstrates the step forward that Kitchen 713 is taking with the new location. Do the chefs feel ready to introduce themselves to people who will be trying their food for the first time?

“We have no choice now,” Haywood says “We’ve embraced the gravity of the situation. We’re very confident and have faith that it will all play out.” 

ADVERTISEMENT
Learn More