Boozy News

A margarita rebound: Much criticized drinks festival greatly improves in year two

A margarita rebound: Much criticized drinks festival greatly improves

Houston Margarita Fest pouring a margarita from a spout October 2013
No problems with long lines or running out of drinks at this year's Houston Margarita Festival. Houston Margarita Fest/Facebook
Houston Margarita Fest group of girls October 2013
For the most part, attendees enjoyed the second year event.  Houston Margarita Fest/Facebook
Houston Margarita Fest October crowd and George R. Brown Convention Center
Great fall weather probably helped. Houston Margarita Fest/Facebook
Houston Margarita Fest October 2013 limbo contest
The key is to drink enough that a limbo contest seems like a good idea but not so much that you can't make it under.  Houston Margarita Fest/Facebook
Houston Margarita Fest pouring a margarita from a spout October 2013
Houston Margarita Fest group of girls October 2013
Houston Margarita Fest October crowd and George R. Brown Convention Center
Houston Margarita Fest October 2013 limbo contest

New Orleans has the Sazerac. New York has the Manhattan. For Houstonians, the margarita is every bit as essential as any other city's signature cocktail.

It's fitting that a one-day festival is devoted to the drink, but last year's first attempt left much to be desired. Attendees complained about long lines and short supplies. That's typical of first-year festivals, but did the Houston Margarita Festival improve in its second year?

"We had no major complaints and everyone seemed to have a great time."&

The answer is a qualified yes — based on Twitter and Facebook reaction from the weekend event. Unlike last year, no one has complained about too-long lines or running out of supplies. With 17 different margaritas available, the festival went with a something-for-everyone approach that elicited a lot of enthusiastic praise from attendees. Judging by the pictures, people enjoyed the limbo and salsa competitions, too.

Certainly the picturesque fall weather and ideal setting at Discovery Green didn't hurt either. 

But not everyone was convinced. Freelance food writer and Houston Barbecue Festival organizer J.C. Reid didn't like his chocolate margarita and called it a "generic festival type thing."Another attendee complained about a lack of frozen options in the V.I.P. section, where tickets ranged from $60 to $150, depending on when they were purchased. Compared to last year, those are more quibbles than strong indictments.

CultureMap contacted the event organizers who said they were still compiling final numbers but called the event a success. "We had no major complaints and everyone seemed to have a great time," they wrote in an email.

Now to get those frozen machines spinned up a little more quickly. And let's all agree that chocolate and margaritas are two great tastes that don't taste great together.

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