Wine and Beer Revival

Heights market beats summer heat with new beer, wine, and cocktail options

Heights market beats the heat with new beer, wine, and cocktails

Revival Market wine selection
Wine and beer have come to Revival Market. Photo by Julia Weber
Revival Market michelada
They'll mix you a michelada. Photo by Julia Weber
Revival Market Paul Verant cocktail
The Paul Verant is made with vermouth, Topo Chico, and lime. Photo by Julia Weber
Revival Market mimosa
Get a mimosa in the morning. Photo by Julia Weber
Revival Market beer selection
Beer is available for both dine-in and to-go. Photo by Julia Weber
Revival Market wine selection
Revival Market michelada
Revival Market Paul Verant cocktail
Revival Market mimosa
Revival Market beer selection

Heights residents with a taste for boutique wines, craft beer, and boozy agua frescas have a new outlet for wetting their collective whistles. Two years after voters approved a measure that repealed the historic dry zone in The Heights, Revival Market is now serving and selling a tidy selection of wine, beer, and cocktails.

“We wanted to sell wine and beer from the beginning,” co-owner Morgan Weber said in a statement. “One of the keys to success in a multi-faceted concept like Revival — café, retailer, coffee shop, butcher shop — is being able to reply on multiple revenue centers for daily sales. We’ll also finally be able to provide our Revival Market guests with creative beverages and thoughtful wine and beer lists just as we do at our other concepts.”

General manager Layne Cruz began the TABC approval process in early 2019. Working with Coltivare sommelier-general manager Leonora Varvoutis, Cruz has assembled a list of 20 wines for sale by the bottle with nine available by the glass. Some of the selections include customer favorites from Coltivare.

"Obviously, our entire list isn’t available at Revival Market, but some of the gems definitely are," Varvoutis stated.

Every bottle is priced under $60 for dine-in guests, with a retail discount available for people who want to take them home. The list's primary goal is to be accessible for diners who want a glass of wine at lunch, a mimosa at breakfast, or a bottle to sip over the course of a lazy afternoon.

"I steered away from big, heavy wines," Cruz added. "This will be a new day-drinking destination, so we want the wines to be light, crushable, and delicious.”

Adding wine will also allow chef Steve Lamborn to update the menu with more snacks and other items that pair well with a beverage or two. Expect more wine dinners and pairing classes from the veteran chef, who came to Revival in May from The Pass & Provisions.

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