Woodlands island life

Fantasy island? Woodlands' hottest new address isn't landlocked any more

Fantasy island? Woodland's hot new address isn't landlocked any more

Lake Woodlands in The Woodlands dock looking at Mitchell Island from Northshore Park
A view of Mitchell Island, to the left, from Northshore Park DebHallHomes.com
Aerial view of Lake Woodlands
Intended for the headquarters of George Mitchell's energy and development company, the 22-acre island will become an exclusive million-dollar community. Google Maps
Lake Woodlands in The Woodlands dock looking at Mitchell Island from Northshore Park
Aerial view of Lake Woodlands

Vacant for nearly three decades, an artificial island in the middle of Lake Woodlands is gearing up to become one of the region's most exclusive gated communities.

The Howard Hughes Corporation — the former development company of everyone's favorite reclusive film producer and aviator — will divide Mitchell Island into 19 single-acre lots costing between $1.5 and $3 million each, according to Swamplot. A bridge from the lake's swanky East Shore neighborhood is under construction.

Mitchell Island will be divided into 19 single-acre lots costing between $1.5 and $3 million each. 

Tim Welbes, co-president of Woodlands Development Company (a Hughes subsidiary), tells CultureMap via email that plans for a "unique collection of homes" are underway but not solidified. Details, including a timeline and potential architects, were not yet available.

Woodlands visionary George Mitchell intended to use the 22-acre island, completed along with the lake in 1985, for the headquarters of his Mitchell Energy & Development Corporation. Plans for the island HQ finally were abandoned in 2005, with little to no activity on the water-bound property since.

But with 10,000 employees expected at Exxon Mobile's forthcoming north Houston campus by 2015, Woodlands development is reaching a fever pitch in an a already-booming local real estate market. The master-planned community, meanwhile, swiftly approaches its final batch of available lots.

“We are selling land at higher price points than we ever have before," Paul Layne of the Hughes Corporation tells the Houston Business Journal. "We have about 2,600 lots left, which should be probably another three to four years of sales."