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Restoration hits home: Salvage Warehouse's historic comeback begins with drive for $350,000

Restoration hits home: Salvage Warehouse's historic comeback begins with drive for $350,000

News_Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse
Edmundson and supporters are ready to find a new location for Historic Houston's Salvage Warehouse. Photo by Steven Thomson
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, September 2012, Lynn Edmundson, Ashton Martini
Lynn Edmundson and Ashton Martini Courtesy Photo
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, September 2012, 2615 Beauchamp, house, Height
2615 Beauchamp in Woodland Heights, the site of Historic Houston's first fundraiser for Salvage Warehouse Courtesy Photo
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, flyer, September 2012
Come one, come all!
News_Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, September 2012, Lynn Edmundson, Ashton Martini
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, September 2012, 2615 Beauchamp, house, Height
Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse, fundraiser, flyer, September 2012

Historic Houston’s Salvage Warehouse is on the way to its own revival with a first fundraising event, “The Art of Restoration,” kicking off the organization’s $350,000 campaign toward a new facility.

From 3 to 6 p.m. Sunday, supporters and interested guests are invited to enjoy light bites, beer and wine at 2614 Beauchamp, as well as tour the circa-1900s Woodland Heights house now in the early stages of restoration. Participants are encouraged to support Historic Houston with a financial donation.

Ashton Martini of Martha Turner Properties is hosting the casual affair for the effort, which is spearheaded by Lynn Edmundson, Salvage Warehouse founder and executive director.

“I know how important the Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse is as a community resource,” Martini says. “Homes and commercial structures in historic districts require obsolete but necessary structural parts and fixtures for vintage homes, as well as irreplaceable period items such as reclaimed hardwood floors, windows, claw-foot tubs, pedestal sinks, lighting and much more.”

“I know how important the Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse is as a community resource,” Martini says.

Edmundson says that ever since the warehouse was forced to close its doors in June 2011 due to the economic downturn, she has been repeatedly asked when the warehouse will reopen. People continue to bring items for donation, even leaving materials at her house.

“Well, I’m glad to announce we’re back,” she says. “This fundraiser, which will be the first of many, is an important milestone in the fundraising plan to reopen our Salvage Warehouse.”

Salvage Warehouse first opened in September 2003 under the direction of Edmundson. During the course of almost a decade, she and Historic Houston saved tons of building elements from the landfill by instead selling the salvaged goods to architects, designers, artists, homebuilders and property owners.

Historic Houston announced just this summer the drive to save this gem for reclaimed building materials. Interested donors can become members of Historic Houston (an individual membership starts at $40) or contribute to the capital campaign (the first level begins at $100).

For more information on the Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse and “The Art of Restoration” fundraiser, visit www.historichouston.org or call Edmundson at 713-522-0542.