Bike Friendly Home Romp

The Heights' best revamped houses: This home tour embraces change and new construction


Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 1615 Columbia
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux
Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 1011 Heights Blvd.
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux
Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 1638 Harvard
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux
Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 713 E. 13th St.
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux
Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 1414 Ashland
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux
Houston Heights Association Spring Home & Garden Tour April 2015 2023 Arlington
Photo by Cressandra Thibodeaux

Celebrating renovated historic and recently constructed residences, the Houston Heights Association's 2015 Spring Home & Garden Tour showcases six houses following the theme, "Embracing Change." The tour runs from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Advance tickets for $20 are available online and at Buchanan's Native Plants, 611 E. 11th St.; Jubilee, 325 W. 19th St; and Another Place in Time, 421 W. 11th St. Tickets may be purchased on the days of the tour for $25 at the Houston Heights Fire Station, 12th and Yale streets, and at all pre-sale ticket locations. No tickets will be sold at the homes on the tour.

Luxury shuttle buses will transport tour visitors from the fire station to the homes. Bicyclists will find bicycle racks at each location and a "bicycle valet" to assist with parking and securing bikes.

Let's take a preview of the houses on the "Embracing Change" home and garden tour.

1615 Columbia St.
The Nelson Home

This 1920s bungalow received a complete and thoughtful renovation in 2012. Front and back porches offer outdoor living spaces, and inside, a front parlor and fireplace greet visitors. The lushly landscaped backyard has a summer kitchen, pool and hot tub.

1011 Heights Blvd.
The Johnson Home

A recognizable landmark on the tree-lined boulevard, this Queen Anne Victorian built in 1907 by brick mason Samuel H. Webber for his family is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The residence served the community for a period of time as a bed-and-breakfast.

Notable architectural features include asymmetrical hipped roofline with a gable end bay and a turret, a side porte-cochere, a front porch with Doric half-columns on brick piers and a recessed entry way.

 

1638 Harvard St.
The Gilbert Home

When the owner purchased this 1920 one-story bungalow in 2009, she knew it lacked central heat and air. Today, the residence combines old and new with the removal of aluminum cladding to reveal the original teardrop wood siding and modern touches like Vetrazzo (recycled glass) and concrete countertops.

The master bedroom door is fashioned from the stained glass of a decommissioned Catholic church, and three different stained-glass windows add even more character. One contemporary, one Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired and one traditional.

 

 

713 E. 13th St.
McIngvale-Cegelski Home

This new kid on the block, built in 2014, embodies Craftsman charm and is truly reminiscent of period Heights architecture. Details include exposed rafter tails, decorative gables, a porte-cochere, solid wood Craftsman-style doors and nine light-patterned windows.

The home is complete with a full-width front porch and large covered back porch.

1414 Ashland St.
The Roche Home

Completed in 2014, the modern Craftsman was designed to preserve three mature live oak trees, home to families of yellow-crested night herons that return every spring. The favorite spot for those feathered friends thus earned the nickname, "The Heron House."

A Craftsman-style door of metal and glass and double-hung windows are just some of the period-influenced touches, as are four porches.

2023 Arlington St.
The Lopez-Marks Home

This 1921 Craftsman bungalow sits on a nearly one-half-acre lot and is recognized as a Houston Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The owners, who have lived in several houses in the area, purchased the residence in 1994 as their "new" home.

Highlights include four porches, reclaimed shiplap from the structure's original walls and a great room that doubles in size when a retractable wall is opened.

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