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TMI: Lady Gaga's Body Revolution campaign is starting to look like soft porn

Rachael Abrams headshot
Lady Gaga
Nude photo of Lady Gaga posted on her Facebook.    Photo by Terry Richardson
Lady Gaga
Photo of Lady Gaga posted on her Facebook and littlemonsters.com for her Body Revolution. Courtesy of Lady Gaga Facebook

Lady Gaga's new curvaceous body has rail-thin fans and media buzzing. But her following of bold personalities is just as terrifying.

Sure, 25 pounds is a lot of weight to gain in a short amount of time. I mean, my doctor suggested that I lose the weight I gained during my seven months in culinary school — and I busted my ass to do so. However, in hindsight, I’m not sure why. At 5-foot-3 and 115 pounds, I thought I was OK (and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I was). But it was my doctor’s serious “You know, you gained five pounds since I last saw you” that just about scared me into anorexia.

There’s a problem when even medical professionals are conforming to these so-called societal “norms.”

So when I heard about Gaga’s weight gain, I rolled my eyes. Who cares? At least she owns it. Plus, she’s not really fat. But when the superstar took her new frame and started a Body Revolution on her social media sites — Twitter and littlemonsters.com — where she urges followers to post photos in order to break eating disorders and insecurities, I was appalled.

Ladies and gents of all ages are flaunting half-naked photos of themselves online, so her “revolution” is starting to look like soft porn. I’m confident we’d get the point if these people were fully clothed. I understand the empowerment that goes along with tweeting and messaging posts about expressing body issues and prevention, but why the photos?

Did the world really need more creepy pictures in their newsfeeds and in Google search — now with slogans like “she was born this way” and “you are beautiful?” I’m not shocked Gaga posted a picture of herself in a bra and underwear. But to lure in everyone with a half-naked photo (and urging them to do the same) tagged with the sympathetic slogan, “Bulimia and Anorexia since I was 15,” seems a little perverse. 

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