Oil Spill Aftermath

Not in living colors: Six weeks after the Galveston Bay oil spill, haunting images linger


1 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Canal on west side of JCT 124 South
Photo by Katie Oxford
5 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Ditch along JCT 124 facing north. Great Egret and Night Heron below
Photo by Katie Oxford
4 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Marsh - looking west from JCT 124
Photo by Katie Oxford
12 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Looking down from top of platform - behind the blockade at west end of Galveston Island
Photo by Katie Oxford
2 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Up close in the canal under Intracoastal Bridge
Photo by Katie Oxford
7 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Along side the dirt road leading under the Intracoastal Bridge. Hair and hoof on bank
Photo by Katie Oxford
6 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Canal - south side of Intracoastal Bridge along JCT 124
Photo by Katie Oxford
3 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Marsh - north of High Island, Texas
Photo by Katie Oxford
10 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Low tide at Ferry Landing - Galveston
Photo by Katie Oxford
11 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Dead grass and tattered tires - beyond the blockade
Photo by Katie Oxford
9 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Willet bathing - Bolivar peninsula
Photo by Katie Oxford
17 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 What’s left behind.
Photo by Katie Oxford
18 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 Left, alone, to recover from a double whammy
Photo by Katie Oxford
16 Katie Oxford Galveston oil spill Part 4 May 2014 The big picture behind the blockade - west end of Galveston - Galveston Bay beyond.
Photo by Katie Oxford

Six weeks after the Galveston Bay oil spill, after the booms were hauled in and the blockades removed, I put my boots on and went looking for what was left. Mother Nature. Left, alone, to recover after being hit with a double whammy.  168,000 gallons of oil and God knows how many gallons of PES-51 (cleaning agent) used to disperse it.

What I found was a natural world, sickened.  

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I looked up close under the Intracoastal Bridge Bridge, in the ditches. . .

 
 

Facing north along JCT 124 south. Great Egret in flight, Night Heron below.  

 

 

. . .along the marsh, a mix of dead grass along the water amid the green reeds that thrive....

 

. . .finally, behind the blockade west of Galveston where the cleaning crew was stationed....

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Looking down from top of platform at west end of Galveston Island.

 

 

. . .and at the end of the day, I felt sick myself.

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South of Intracoastal Bridge along JCT 124.

 

Sometimes, I wanted to put the camera down and cry. In some places, the smell was so foul that I had to step back for a while. ___________________________________________

Area between marsh and JCT 124.  

 

I took few notes. In oil spills, especially their aftermath, the camera speaks.  "If," as Winnie Burkett said . . 

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Area between marsh and JCT 124.

". . .you know where to look."

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A marsh just north of High Island.

 

 

After observing two oil spills (in Louisiana and Galveston Bay) . . .

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Low tide at Ferry Landing.

 

 

I've come to believe. . . ____________________________________

Dead grass and tattered tires beyond the blockade.

 

 

that it'd be better if we left the clean up job to Mother Nature.

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Willet on shoreline at Bolivar Flats Bird Sanctuary.

Driving home, some words came haunting.  

Something that Mama said from her hospital bed.  

Wearily.

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Pool of water at west end of Galveston.

 

"The chemo's killing me more than the cancer."

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