Changing Houston

Another new park for Houston? Endangered community garden's land sought for city green space

Another new park for Houston? Endangered community garden land sought

1 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
Greenleaf Gardens at 803 Kipling St. in Audubon Place. Houston Association of Realtors
2 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
The property owner built raised beds on the site and began leasing them out to residents as a community garden in 2012. Houston Association of Realtors
3 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
A small garden shed stands on the property. Houston Association of Realtors
4 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
The site is fully fenced. The garden is complete with a rainwater harvesting system and compost bins. Houston Association of Realtors
5 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
Another view of the community garden. Houston Association of Realtors
1 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
2 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
3 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
4 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015
5 803 Kipling St. community garden for sale February 2015

An organic community garden in a Montrose-area historic district may become the city's next new green space.

The city has submitted a letter of intent to purchase the 8,400-square-foot lot at 803 Kipling St. in the Audubon Place Historic District to the owner's broker, Blake Hillegeist, at a "slightly decreased" price. The property, also known as Greenleaf Gardens, is still on MLS for $630,000 after about a month of being on the market.

"We've been contacted by a broker who represents the city of Houston," Hillegeist tells CultureMap. "We signed off on the letter of intent and terms and are just waiting for the city to return with a formal purchase contract."

One of those terms in agreement between seller and potential buyer is to keep the property a "public space," Hillegeist says, adding the owner is accepting the lower offer to help keep the property from being developed in a manner not in keeping with the historic district's character. The discounted sales price is not being disclosed at this time.

Hillegeist says the city has a 90-day feasibility period to review the possible purchase. The final decision must then go before city council for approval.

The owner built raised flower beds on the site, located at the corner of Kipling and Stanford streets, and began leasing them out to residents as a community garden in 2012.