Houston Archeological Society presents Archeological Legacy of Poverty Point

Houston Archeological Society presents Archeological Legacy of Poverty Point
Photo courtesy of Houston Archeological Society

This event is a lecture that highlights the Poverty Point World Heritage Site. This earthworks complex was built and occupied by Native American Indians from about 1700 to 1100 BCE in what is today northeast Louisiana. Some archeologists refer to Poverty Point as the "New York City" of its day because it was so huge, sophisticated and out-of-character compared to everything else going on at that time. Trading hub, engineering marvel, monument to ingenuity—the original configuration included five earthen mounds; six nested, c-shaped, earthen ridges that served as the habitation area; and a flat interior plaza.

Although it is not the oldest or the largest mound complex in North America, it stands out as something special—a singularity—because of its scale and design, and because the people here lived by hunting, fishing and gathering wild foods. Also, because there was no naturally occurring rock at the site, tons of stone for tools and other objects were brought in over distances up to 800 miles. At Poverty Point, people can glimpse a reflection of humanity that no longer exists.

Event Details

When

10.4.16 | 6:30 pm

Where

5555 Hermann Park Dr.
Houston, TX 77030

PHONE

Ticket Info

$12-$18